Boys will be boys

These tiny little fella’s look like boys anywhere else. They play, they joke, they laugh, they fight. The only difference is their stories. Stories of devastation, lost homes, lost lives, lost parents. Sometimes even losing them violently in front of their eyes. Eyes who are way too young to watch what they have watched. All growing up without a mother or a father. Here they are, on their knees, sharing their secrets and worries. And still, they play, they joke, they laugh, they fight. Like any other boy. If there is one thing I am learning from them, it is resilience. The courage to keep moving, to keep going forward. To not let anything make you give up. They are such clever, brilliant and wise human beings. I have faith that they will get wherever they want to go. Because they don’t give up. Giving up simply does not exist here. Let my little brothers inspire you on this Thursday night. To chase your dreams and go where you want to go. And don’t tell me something is stopping you. It’s only on your mind. Dream big and move forward. You simply owe it to them to do so.

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HUMANS OF IRAQ

I have never told you about this guy before. Meet Sarmad. Doctor Sarmad. Three months ago he walked into my office, applying for the job of interpreter (translator). It was love at first sight – he flew right into my heart. My colleague whom I conducted the interview with agreed immediately with me. “I want him!”. In the past three months I got to see his amazing personality: devoted, honest, humble, ambitious and loyal (epic combination!!). And incredibly helpful to EVERYONE. Even when we are having lunch, he leaves the table to talk to a 14 year old waiter that looks ill to offer him help to get better – gives him his number to talk more later. When we discuss cases at the camps, he provides medical advice even though I forbid him, he just cannot not help.

Besides explaining me everything I need to understand about this context (culture, politics, language etc), he shows me what it’s like to grow up in a country at war that is full of corruption. It’s fucking fucked up. I can’t make it any nicer, really. Sarmad has studied hard for 6 years to become a doctor. He finished and started working in the hospitals here and earns 350 dollars a month for a full time job. I repeat, the guy is a DOCTOR. 350 dollars a month (€250). He did not receive any payments over the last 3 (!!) months because the Ministry of Health is out of money. How can you support your family if this is how things work? Build a future? This is why he applied to work with me as an interpreter besides his job at the hospital because he is saving up for a future in Europe. Exciting times are coming. He is making his way to Europe soon (inshallah) to do his specialism in medicine. I cannot even think about the day he will leave, I have gotten totally attached to his generosity and amazingness. So I just try not to think about it and absorb every hour we get to work together and learn from each other.

This picture was taken about a month ago after we spent 6 hours in a car and could not get out because it was a bit dangerous. I needed to pee for 3 hours but he kept on joking so I forgot about it. This photo is just after our ‘release’ (and after I went to the toilet☺️). Our bodies full of stress but wow we were so relieved. So he wanted to take a picture to celebrate, to remember this moment. And as he usually doesn’t smile at pictures (it’s a Middle Eastern habit) I forced him to produce one smile. And I got the ridiculous version!

Bless people like him, who struggle but never lose hope. These are the people we can learn from, the ones that keep us going. Thank you dear friend, شكرا Sarmad, you inspire me!

Lines of laundry

I have had a fascination for lines of laundry since I started traveling. Not sure whether I am just a bit obsessed or crazy but it just always shows where in the world I am and what life is like. Here the children only have 1 or (if they are lucky) 2 sets of clothing and as it’s really cold these days in the desert, it takes more than a day to dry 1 set (on a barbed wired fence). Most of them only wear pajamas because those were distributed when they arrived here. They did not have time to pack their wardrobes because they had to flee quickly. The kids told me yesterday how they don’t want to go to school because they are too embarrassed to go in their dirty clothes. Plus, they are cold so they are hesitant to leave their tents. Can you imagine? I never had to worry about these things. I was only reluctant to get out of the hot shower into a cold bathroom. I actually still do, here…Crazy differences.

Waiting for the sun

Life is never easy in a refugee camp. I have heard so many stories of people losing hope, fear and even worse, their dreams. There is no such thing as Sinterklaas or Christmas here. All they do is wait, waiting for the war to end, waiting for a future in the area where they fled from. Three years of waiting… Just compare that to our frustration when a train is five minutes late.. luckily, those displaced people invented the concept of resilience. And so a sunset like this one is still noted. Thanks to the ones pointing beauty out to me today.